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Articles about the work of Jesse Eisinger

Where the Bubbles Are
futureofcapitalism.com

ProPublica's Jesse Eisinger has been awarded a column in the New York Times, which explains that ProPublica "produces investigative journalism in the public interest." The formulation makes one wonder in whose interest the rest of journalism is published in.

The first column explains, "The Russell 2000 stock index, which is made up of smaller companies, has risen about 21 percent since the beginning of September, when investors started to anticipate that the Fed would intervene in an aggressive fashion."

And here we had thought the run up in stocks wasn't purely because of the Fed but because of the anticipation that Republicans would win big in November's election and push through extensions of tax cuts. Silly us.

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Goldman Sachs and Navel Gazing
futureofcapitalism.com

A column in today's New York Times appears under the headline "Goldman Sachs's Navel-Gazing Comes Up Short." The column, provided by the non-profit news organization ProPublica, criticizes Goldman Sachs and advises the firm to break itself up into smaller pieces:

Despite Goldman's reputation in some corners as Evil Genius, its shares are actually suffering in the marketplace because investors worry about its volatile and unpredictable results from quarter to quarter. These concerns were validated when Goldman reported on Wednesday that trading and securities services profit took a big hit in the fourth quarter, dropping 31 percent. The stock slid 3 percent by midafternoon in response.

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Second Liens and Firsts
futureofcapitalism.com

From a column in today's New York Times provided by ProPublica, a non-profit news organization:

Bill Frey, who runs Greenwich Financial Services, has instigated lawsuits to try to recoup the value of mortgage securities by getting the banks to buy back faulty mortgages that were in the pools he examined....

Mr. Frey argues that the banks should charge off those seconds. "That's the concept of subordination," he said. "It's been around since the Magna Carta. Maybe we should get on the bandwagon."

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Eisinger on BAC and Buffett
futureofcapitalism.com

ProPublica's Jesse Eisinger, whose work I have criticized in the past, makes a good point in writing about Warren Buffett's investment in Bank of America:

Mr. Buffett's investment reveals something both infuriating and scary. Bank of America has not been talking straight about its need for capital.

"You cannot have the largest bank in the country saying, 'We don't need the money,' and then paying this kind of price to Warren Buffett for capital they say they don't need," said Daniel Alpert, who runs the investment firm Westwood Capital. "Industrywide, it's a potential boomerang because we think, 'Why should we believe any of these guys when they say they don't need the money?' "

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Read It Here First
futureofcapitalism.com

The New York Times makes a Jesse Eisinger column out of that Dallas Fed report on "too big to fail" and banking regulation that was covered here back on March 22. Mr. Einsinger cavils:

the rebel regional Fed presidents have been skeptical about the Fed's aggressive and successful monetary policy and overly worried about inflation and the vulnerability of the dollar.

The Fed's monetary policy is so "successful" that the housing market bottom is still "elusive," the unemployment rate is still 8.3%, and the value of a dollar as measured in ounces of gold has fallen by about half over the past three years.

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Hedge Fund Advertising
futureofcapitalism.com

ProPublica has a column, which also runs in the New York Times, critical of the Securities and Exchange Commission's decision to allow hedge funds and other private investment partnerships to advertise in search of investors. The columnist complains that the SEC "not plan to mandate any new process to ensure" that the "investments are appropriate" for the investors.

There are at least three flaws with this line of criticism.

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Hedge Fund Advertising
futureofcapitalism.com

ProPublica has a column, which also runs in the New York Times, critical of the Securities and Exchange Commission's decision to allow hedge funds and other private investment partnerships to advertise in search of investors. The columnist complains that the SEC "not plan to mandate any new process to ensure" that the "investments are appropriate" for the investors.

There are at least three flaws with this line of criticism.

Read More...


Read It Here First
futureofcapitalism.com

The New York Times makes a Jesse Eisinger column out of that Dallas Fed report on "too big to fail" and banking regulation that was covered here back on March 22. Mr. Einsinger cavils:

the rebel regional Fed presidents have been skeptical about the Fed's aggressive and successful monetary policy and overly worried about inflation and the vulnerability of the dollar.

The Fed's monetary policy is so "successful" that the housing market bottom is still "elusive," the unemployment rate is still 8.3%, and the value of a dollar as measured in ounces of gold has fallen by about half over the past three years.

Read More...


Eisinger on BAC and Buffett
futureofcapitalism.com

ProPublica's Jesse Eisinger, whose work I have criticized in the past, makes a good point in writing about Warren Buffett's investment in Bank of America:

Mr. Buffett's investment reveals something both infuriating and scary. Bank of America has not been talking straight about its need for capital.

"You cannot have the largest bank in the country saying, 'We don't need the money,' and then paying this kind of price to Warren Buffett for capital they say they don't need," said Daniel Alpert, who runs the investment firm Westwood Capital. "Industrywide, it's a potential boomerang because we think, 'Why should we believe any of these guys when they say they don't need the money?' "

Read More...


Where the Bubbles Are
futureofcapitalism.com

ProPublica's Jesse Eisinger has been awarded a column in the New York Times, which explains that ProPublica "produces investigative journalism in the public interest." The formulation makes one wonder in whose interest the rest of journalism is published in.

The first column explains, "The Russell 2000 stock index, which is made up of smaller companies, has risen about 21 percent since the beginning of September, when investors started to anticipate that the Fed would intervene in an aggressive fashion."

And here we had thought the run up in stocks wasn't purely because of the Fed but because of the anticipation that Republicans would win big in November's election and push through extensions of tax cuts. Silly us.

Read More...


Goldman Sachs and Navel Gazing
futureofcapitalism.com

A column in today's New York Times appears under the headline "Goldman Sachs's Navel-Gazing Comes Up Short." The column, provided by the non-profit news organization ProPublica, criticizes Goldman Sachs and advises the firm to break itself up into smaller pieces:

Despite Goldman's reputation in some corners as Evil Genius, its shares are actually suffering in the marketplace because investors worry about its volatile and unpredictable results from quarter to quarter. These concerns were validated when Goldman reported on Wednesday that trading and securities services profit took a big hit in the fourth quarter, dropping 31 percent. The stock slid 3 percent by midafternoon in response.

Read More...


Second Liens and Firsts
futureofcapitalism.com

From a column in today's New York Times provided by ProPublica, a non-profit news organization:

Bill Frey, who runs Greenwich Financial Services, has instigated lawsuits to try to recoup the value of mortgage securities by getting the banks to buy back faulty mortgages that were in the pools he examined....

Mr. Frey argues that the banks should charge off those seconds. "That's the concept of subordination," he said. "It's been around since the Magna Carta. Maybe we should get on the bandwagon."

Read More...


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Jesse Eisinger

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ProPublica, senior reporter

Conde Nast Portfolio, Wall Street Editor

Wall Street Journal

TheStreet.com 1997-1999

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Books by Jesse Eisinger:
The Wall Street Money Machine (Kindle Single)
By: Jesse Eisinger and Jake Bernstein
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Married to author and former Wall Street Journal reporter Sarah Ellison.

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