Search for a Journalist:
Articles about the work of Andrew Frye

Buffett and Forest River
futureofcapitalism.com

At a certain point, you start to wonder how many of these awkward situations Warren Buffett can be involved in and still retain the kindly squeaky clean image. First General Re, then, no matter what you think of the underlying case, Goldman Sachs, and Moody's. Now, according to the Bloomberg wire, there's a lawsuit from a former executive, Brad Mart, of a Berkshire-owned recreational vehicle company, Forest River, who says that he raised allegations of fraud at the company in six phone calls with Mr. Buffett:

Liegl required Forest River to buy parts at inflated prices from a company he owned and appropriated cash from factory vending machines, Mart said. Liegl also reneged on a promise to make Mart CEO, according to the complaint. Mart alleged in the suit that Liegl threatened his life.

Read More...


Jim Tisch in Bloomberg News
futureofcapitalism.com

The CEO of Loews Corp., Jim Tisch, who is smart, gives an interview to Bloomberg News, which the wire service unloads in two parts, one here on investment ideas and one here on politics and the economy overall:

Tisch, 57, said President Barack Obama's health care reform, financial regulation and moratorium on offshore drilling are keeping businesses from spending money to expand.

"The thing that business people don't like is uncertainty," Tisch said in an interview at Bloomberg's New York headquarters yesterday. "Part of the problem is that business has very little confidence in what's been going on and very little visibility."...

Read More...


Munger on the Giving Pledge
futureofcapitalism.com

Bloomberg News has a piece covering a talk that Berkshire Hathaway vice chairman Charles Munger gave at the University of Michigan in which Mr. Munger more or less explains why he hasn't signed on to the Warren Buffett-Bill Gates "Giving Pledge." From the article:

At the same event, Munger said private investment may advance society more than charity. He's a director at Costco Wholesale Corp., the largest U.S. warehouse-club chain, and has been Berkshire's vice chairman for more than three decades.

"I believe Costco does more for civilization than the Rockefeller Foundation," Munger said. "I think it's a better place. You get a bunch of very intelligent people sitting around trying to do good, I immediately get kind of suspicious and squirm in my seat."

Read More...


Buffett and Forest River
futureofcapitalism.com

At a certain point, you start to wonder how many of these awkward situations Warren Buffett can be involved in and still retain the kindly squeaky clean image. First General Re, then, no matter what you think of the underlying case, Goldman Sachs, and Moody's. Now, according to the Bloomberg wire, there's a lawsuit from a former executive, Brad Mart, of a Berkshire-owned recreational vehicle company, Forest River, who says that he raised allegations of fraud at the company in six phone calls with Mr. Buffett:

Liegl required Forest River to buy parts at inflated prices from a company he owned and appropriated cash from factory vending machines, Mart said. Liegl also reneged on a promise to make Mart CEO, according to the complaint. Mart alleged in the suit that Liegl threatened his life.

Read More...


Jim Tisch in Bloomberg News
futureofcapitalism.com

The CEO of Loews Corp., Jim Tisch, who is smart, gives an interview to Bloomberg News, which the wire service unloads in two parts, one here on investment ideas and one here on politics and the economy overall:

Tisch, 57, said President Barack Obama's health care reform, financial regulation and moratorium on offshore drilling are keeping businesses from spending money to expand.

"The thing that business people don't like is uncertainty," Tisch said in an interview at Bloomberg's New York headquarters yesterday. "Part of the problem is that business has very little confidence in what's been going on and very little visibility."...

Read More...


Munger on the Giving Pledge
futureofcapitalism.com

Bloomberg News has a piece covering a talk that Berkshire Hathaway vice chairman Charles Munger gave at the University of Michigan in which Mr. Munger more or less explains why he hasn't signed on to the Warren Buffett-Bill Gates "Giving Pledge." From the article:

At the same event, Munger said private investment may advance society more than charity. He's a director at Costco Wholesale Corp., the largest U.S. warehouse-club chain, and has been Berkshire's vice chairman for more than three decades.

"I believe Costco does more for civilization than the Rockefeller Foundation," Munger said. "I think it's a better place. You get a bunch of very intelligent people sitting around trying to do good, I immediately get kind of suspicious and squirm in my seat."

Read More...


To Add an Article Link, please sign in.

First time here? Register Free as a New User.

Write a Review of work by this Journalist

To post your review, please sign in.

First time here? Register Free as a New User.

Post a prediction made by this Journalist

To post a prediction, please sign in.

First time here? Register Free as a New User.

Andrew Frye

Age:

Facebook Page:
Twitter Account:
Phone Number:
Email Address:
Country:
Frequent Topics of Writing:
Media Outlets:
Work History:
Websites/Blogs:
Books by Andrew Frye:
Educational History:
Voter registration/Party affiliation:
Charities:
Professional Network/Frequent Sources:
Personal Network/Friends and Allies:

Sign In

Email:

Password:

Or via Facebook  

Register as a New User

© 2018 FutureOfCapitalism, LLC.

Home   |   About   |   Browse Journalists   |   Terms of Service   |   Privacy Policy

Smartertimes  |  FutureOfCapitalism.com